Posted in Railways on Saturday 27th June 2009 at 11:24pm


The day started ominously misty. Given the pretty amazing weather we've been having this left the awkward British summertime conundrum - to take a coat or not. Decided to throw caution to the wind and go without. I need not have worried, as by the time we were scudding over the levels the mist was already lifting, and we appeared to be in for a glorious day. Our first winner of the day was Advenza's recently recomissioned 66841 which was stabled on the former Bath Road spur at the back of Temple Meads. Plenty of time to wander over for a shot before getting much needed coffee and heading for the 07:00 Voyager.

The destination was the Dean Forest Railway, a location I'd visited years ago on foot but had never travelled on. Their small summer diesel event was competing for punters with some major tours to Cornwall and a couple of locos being out of traffic also kept a few punters away. However, arriving early due to the poor service to Lydney, we made a quick tour of the site and were encouraged by staff to have a good look at the locos undergoing refurbishment in what appear to be huge 'polytunnels' standing on what appears to be the course of the former line to the docks. Having spent almost an hour enjoying the sunshine and exploring the site, the first train of the day arrived with 'Teddy Bear' D9521 in charge. A swift loco change to get E6001 on the front and we were off.

31466 arrives at Lydney Junction
31466 arrives at Lydney Junction

The timetable was generous but not intensive, and featured the Class 14, E6001 and the DMU in addition to the star attraction for me, the recently repainted 31466. Our first move was to switch between the high and low level platforms at the unusually laid out Norchard station to get the DMU. Intelligence from previous galas indicated that this would stick around in platform 1 at Lydney Junction for most of the day as a sales stand and buffet. Thus this was a sensible way to get an arrival into the less preferred platform and to guarantee a ride on the DMU. From here, we settled into a pattern of trips back and forth the full length of the line. A decent gradient up from Norchard and some spectacular scenery made for some entertaining performance from 31466 in particular.

E6001 climbs to Norchard High Level
E6001 climbs to Norchard High Level

With the sun seemingly stronger by the hour, we took a mid-afternoon break for refreshments and photographs at Norchard before a final run on E6001. Much as I enjoyed this loco, it seemed to crop up on one too many trains, and it will be a real boost when the line gets either its resident Class 27 or 37 back up and running for a little variery. After some final shots of an absurd lash up of ED and Teddy Bear leaving Lydney we wandered over to the mainline station to find services heavily delayed. Hung around in the still intense sun and waited, speculating on the chances of a Class 60 hauled freight passing. Eventually, a mercifully well air-conditioned Class 175 arrived and took us to Gloucester, where the much delayed service terminated to head back to South Wales. Took the opportunity for a break in Gloucester, and arrived back in time to see 60013 curving into the station with a train of empty fuel tanks! An unexpected bonus. Worked our way back to Highbridge via a change at Filton Abbey Wood, arriving in time to position ourselves for a photograph of Spitfire's 'Kernow Growler' tour on it's return leg in fine early evening light.

37087 and 37194 lead 'The Kernow Growler' through Highbridge
37087 and 37194 lead 'The Kernow Growler' through Highbridge

I was sceptical about today's excursion given last weeks rather amazing trip, but the Dean Forest Railway produced some fine entertainment in a spectacular setting, despite limited locomotives in operation. Definitely a railway to revisit when a few more are up and running. As it turned out, a pretty good day out with plenty of surprises.

Movebook Link

Posted in Railways on Monday 22nd June 2009 at 2:56pm


It's my custom here to try to comment on things as soon after they happen as possible, but this weekend has been extraordinary in a number of ways, and the need to get some rest and reflect on a fantastic few days has been welcome. I've tried to recollect the events of the past few days as accurately as possible, and probably included far too many pictures of Western Champion in the process. I make no apology - it was a remarkable weekend...

Day 1 - The Northern Lights

Friday started feeling a little chilly and apprehensive. There were a lot of variables involved in this trip, and lots that could go wrong. In fact I'd probably spent more time and money arranging this than some of my jaunts to the USA years ago! However, my fear that FGW might scupper me at the first hurdle were unfounded, and the 05:49 got me to Bristol in time to queue behind various Pathfinder stewards for coffee and breakfast. The stock was already in platform 5, with 'Royal Skip' 67005 at the helm as had been widely predicted the previous evening. Noted that we'd be at the back for the journey northwards, but some mental calculations based on the timings confirmed this would mean being as close as possible to the loco on the return trip.

67005 awaits departure at Bristol Temple Meads
67005 awaits departure at Bristol Temple Meads

An ontime departure followed, and as we picked up along the way it became clear that this was going to be an entertaining trip based on fellow travellers in Coach H. Sat back, enjoyed the decent weather and listened to the banter. It was clear that this trip had brought together a real mixture of people - retired bashers long since off the scene, people with a more current interest, preservationists, indeed given the 'long weekend' format of the trip a good few people had brought along significant others. Settled in for the ride up to Bescot Yard, with a real sense of excitement building as everyone waited for the star turn.

And so, D1015 took over the train. After a smooth, swift loco change we were soon heading north, rejoining the WCML at Bushbury and making very quick progress northwards. It's been four years since I've had the pleasure of a run behind Western Champion and I'd forgotten just how quick and effortless it all felt. Occasionally we were brought to a stand, and even nine coaches from the engine there was an audible growl from the loco and a gust of smoke as we moved away. It was all so effortless in fact that the hours seemed to disappear along with the miles, with neither Shap nor Beattock presenting any problems for Champion. In Quintinshill loop, Dick Unpronouncable set a trend for the weekend by making an announcement about the terrible rail crash of 1915. He repeated his unfortunately disaster-focused commentaries at Bannockburn, Culloden and even a particularly treacherous level crossing at Murthly - which lead to cries of "how many died here then?" every time he announced further points of interest. Once we'd skirted the southern suburbs of Glasgow and worked our way around via Law Junction, Mossend and Cumbernauld, we gained the line north, and began to climb into really wild country. Despite the dire warnings, the promised bad weather hadn't really made an appearance at all - and only in the perpetually grim and forsaken Pass of Druimuachdar did it begin to rain a little during a brief wait at Dalwhinnie.

D1015 waits time at Preston on the outward leg of The Western Chieftain
D1015 waits time at Preston on the outward leg of The Western Chieftain

Soon on our way again, and as we descended from Slochd towards Inverness, the sun breached the clouds and the Moray Firth appeared with the distant mountains in Sutherland bathed in light despite the late hour. There was something quite inspiring about the sight - and fittingly someone quietly, almost reverently, pointed out "bloody hell - a Western has made it to Inverness!". Nobody seemed to want to leave the platform after we'd arrived, with Champion gently ticking over on the buffer stops it certainly felt like we'd all been part of something special. Eventually everyone began to drift off to hotels, pubs and restaurants to celebrate a fantastic day out.

Movebook Entry

Day 2 - How The West Was Won

After a well-earned sleep in a very nice hotel in Town, wandered down early to do a little shopping and enjoy a coffee before the off. It was strange to have plenty of time to make my way to the start of a railtour for a change, but couldn't resist heading for the station early and found plenty of others had felt the same way. Lazed around in fantastic sunshine, chatting and watching units coming and going. There had been much debate about the arrangements for the trip today, but I'd stuck to my guns on this - Champion would lead the stock into platform 1 or 2 - being the only suitably long ones for the train. It then seemed we'd be propelled back to Welsh's Bridge to take the Rose Street Curve to reach the lines heading for Dingwall. This meant the bonus for me of picking up this otherwise hard to get bit of PSUL track. With this manoeuvre completed as planned we made a cautious crossing of the swing bridge at Clacknaharrie before picking up speed as we headed alongside the Beauly Firth towards Dingwall. Had breakfast on the train, and also sampled a few of the ales on board as we turned west onto the Kyle line. There were a mixture of people on board - some hadn't been this way for many years, others had never ventured this far north. However, as we slowly climbed towards the formidable outpost of Raven's Rock, everyone seemed somewhat subdued by the frankly awe-inspiring scenery outside the train. A brief pause to let a unit pass at Achnasheen before we pressed onwards, hugging the shores of Loch Carron as we descended towards the coast.

Eventually, after a fairly swift run we curved into the terminus at Kyle of Lochalsh under amazing blue skies. An emotional moment here, as those responsible for making this trip possible assembled in front of the loco for an impromptu seminar. The last two days had displayed admirably the fantastic efforts which have been undertaken to keep D1015 in tip-top condition. After the obligatory photographs, the crowds went their separate ways in order to fill a long afternoon stop here. For my part, after exploring the village - something I've not had time to do before in the short turn-arounds between trains - I took the bus over the Skye Bridge soaring high over the narrow straight that formerly required a ferry journey. Spent a little while exploring tiny but attractive village of Kyleakin and actually found myself relaxing and not thinking about work for the first time in a very long time. Instead pondered how tricky it must have been to sustain these communities which relied so heavily on the ferry, now that the bridge takes the traffic flying past them.

Those responsible for getting us here pose with the loco
Those responsible for getting us here pose with the loco

Returned by bus to Kyle and had a late lunch sitting on the station platform and reading, while waiting for the stock of our train to be shunted. This was a complex process, involving the entire train being propelled out of the non-preferred platform 2 and into the more often-used platform 1 which allowed the loco to release and run around the coaches. Once reattached, D1015 propelled the train back to the buffers - and ended up making a second attempt due to a problem with the RETB signalling. Joined the group on the road bridge to watch and get pictures of these manoeuvres - which are strange and unusual now in the age of a multiple-unit railway.

Western Champion shunts stock at Kyle of Lochalsh
Western Champion shunts stock at Kyle of Lochalsh

As people drifted back to join the train for the trip back, a piper turned up and busked for the the crowds on the station. For the first time though, we were at the front of the train and the only music I was really interested in hearing was from Western Champion's twin Maybach engines as she made the long ascent back to Luib Summit. First though we had a photo stop - originally planned for Strathcarron, but rescheduled to take place at Stromeferry to prevent the train blocking a level crossing. This proved to be a very fortunate choice as, once we'd stopped we were beckoned across the line to photograph the train. It's a very long time since this has happened on a railtour, and it contributed to the sense that this was adding up to a very special event.

D1015 during a photo break at Stromeferry
D1015 during a photo break at Stromeferry

Treated myself to a further sampling of ales which had been procured on Skye to replace the stock which had been drunk dry on the outward trip. Some very unusual beers almost unheard of on the mainland too. After a storming, noisy run back to Inverness we again used the Rose Street Curve and backed into the platform. Lots of very happy and slightly sun-burned faces as the assembled crowds dispersed to various venues around the city to celebrate another successful day out!

Movebook Entry

Day 3 - Taking The Long Way Home

Another decent night's sleep - a rare thing lately - and soon checked out of the hotel and into Inverness early. Always interesting to watch a city wake up on a Sunday, and managed to make myself the first customer of the day at the coffee shop. Joined the assembling crowds at the station, again in glorious weather, and awaited the arrival of our train. Once again propelled in from the yard, with our coach as close to the front as possible. Away on time, and a twinge of regret as we watched Inverness disappear into the distance as the line climbed to Culloden and turned south. Our first stop was after the fairly brief journey to Aviemore. Took the opportunity for a photograph here, where the crowds across the platform managed to persuade a piper waiting for a train south to pose beside the train and play the pipes briefly for us all. The rather bewildered and admittedly hung-over piper explained that he'd played at a barbecue the previous evening and was heading back to Pitlochry. He seemed genuinely bewildered by the arrival of Western Champion and all the activity, but was soon offered a lift to Perth where he could easily double back to get home. He accepted, and this meant that our next brief stop at Perth also included a performance. As we left the station, with an outrageously loud performance by Champion the piper stood at the end of the platform and piped the train on it's way. A fitting farewell to the Highlands!

Preparing to pipe D1015 away from Perth
Preparing to pipe D1015 away from Perth

From Perth we took the Ladybank line, then the little-used link at Thornton North Junction to follow the Fife Circle through Dunfermline, as the more direct route was closed for works. Eventually made it to the very brink of the Forth Bridge, where there was something of a slip-up with the loco and we ground to a halt. After a brief, worrying moment, things were back underway and we thundered over the immense structure triumphantly, arriving only a few minutes late at Edinburgh Waverley. After a short pause here we set off with an explosive departure through Calton North Tunnel, before slowing at Portobello to take the Suburban Lines. Another bit of required track for me as we curved west again at Niddrie West Junction, then took the line from Craiglockhart Junction to Slateford Junction to access the line to Carstairs and eventually the WCML homewards. With the afternoon proving to be very warm, and a good range of beer left on the train, it was a sleepy trip back to the Midlands. Lots of banter, and plenty of congratulations for the team from the DTG and Pathfinder for the successful weekend. It was around this time that people - some of them very old, experienced hands at this game - started to talk about this being "the best railtour ever". High praise indeed.

Hopped out at Birmingham New Street to watch D1015 detach and head off into the sunset. It had been such a spectacular few days that no-one even managed a disparaging comment for 66206 which DBS had supplied for our journey back to Bristol, perhaps helped by this being a particularly rare example of the class as far as passenger work is concerned? Arrived back at Bristol and made the short trek to my base for the evening, tired but very happy indeed. Well over a thousand miles later, and having been blessed with excellent weather, good company and most of all, fantastic running from a fine locomotive, it's easy to see why even the organisers were considering this one of the best ever. This trip will be remembered for a very long time by those of us who made the trek up to Kyle for the first time with a Western!

Movebook Entry

So, having recuperated and reflected today - was it the best railtour ever? It's hard to say because there are always surprises around the corner. Certainly, there was a palpable sense of history being made over the weekend which added to a celebratory atmosphere. Great weather, a stunning location and fantastic motive power made for a very special event indeed. Trudging back home this morning, feeling knackered and a little bit miserable that it was all over, I came to the conclusion that this will definitely take some beating!

Movebook Link

Posted in Computers on Sunday 14th June 2009 at 10:51pm


It's not often I do any work on the underlying code of this website. Since I wrote Areopagitica four or five years back, I've done just enough tweaking to keep it working or to add features which have been deficient. But the core of this is much what was written back then, in all it's sprawling and messy glory. It's for this reason I've always resisted allowing it out into the wild - although a recent deployment elsewhere which was fairly simple has convinced me it wouldn't be quite so hard to package.

Today's work started as an effort to tidy up and improve the Movebook code to cope better with heritage engines - and sort of spiralled from there. Mainly as a marker for me, the following bits and bobs have seen work:

  • Search highlighting/Permalink display bug fixed
  • Search on both article content and title implemented
  • Movebook now knows about most heritage engine class numberings
  • Stock Reports also take into account heritage class numberings
  • Generated error pages (404 etc) improved and working with secure areas of site

If I can keep up the momentum in spare moments, I'll try to fix one or two other irritations over the coming weeks. It's certainly reminded me that at times when things are, shall we say a little fraught in the workplace, the mental effort of solving programming problems is a rewarding task.

Movebook Link

Posted in Railways on Saturday 13th June 2009 at 7:31pm


I've always sort of regarded the South Devon Railway as my 'local' preserved line. Yes, there are some closer, but the attitude of some lines to diesel traction leaves something to be desired. Somehow, this neat little line with two active diesel preservation groups always manages to turn out a good showing - and their gala weekend is always entertaining. So, onto the first train south for a fairly quiet trip to Totnes. The weather brightened, and I enjoyed a pleasant walk from the mainline station to Littlehempston for the first working of the day - a special using the line's Class 122 railcar taking us to Buckfastleigh in time for the first loco-hauled service back down the line. A good, noisy start to the day's proceedings with the staff clearly enjoying the trip just as much as the few early-bird punters!

This time around, the South Devon had elected to use just their home fleet. This meant plenty of action for their pair of Class 20s, and the next trip down saw 20110 handling a set of clean, tidy and comfortable stock with no problem at all. Plenty of people seemed to be arriving too, which gave proceedings a little more atmosphere. Real Ale bars on both active sets was a nice touch too. The big event of the weekend though, was the return to traffic of 33002 'Sea King' which had recently returned from display at Eastleigh 100 following four years of extensive repair and refurbishment. Still looking pristine in 'Dutch' livery, 33002 joined the train at Buckfastleigh and made a speedy and noisy departure. Fantastic entertainment and bound to produce some interesting photographs from the many lineside camera-folk.

33002 crawls into Staverton
33002 crawls into Staverton

Settled into a pattern of heading up and down the line, enjoying a bite to eat and coffee, and generally enjoying the day. Still somewhat bewildered though, by the vast collection of garden gnomes which cluster on the embankment shortly after leaving Totnes! Gnomes appear in various spots around the railway, but not nearly in such an abundance as here. I'm not sure of their significance at all. In any case, the timetable was arranged perfectly, allowing the discerning enthusiast the opportunity to travel on all of the various combinations of stock and loco, including the DMU which did some in-fill services to Staverton. The loco changes were accomplished very swiftly, and delays were kept to a minimum despite the tight turn-around times. After the less effective arrangements at the Mid Hants a couple of weeks ago, this was a refreshing change. Managed a trip along the line on all of the participating locos, including D7612 and the absolutely storming D6737 which has provided many entertaining runs on the South Devon.

D7612 (25262) departs from Totnes
D7612 (25262) departs from Totnes

As some serious looking clouds were drifting over, decided to call it a day after a few last pictures at Totnes. Soon back to the station and heading homewards on a busy Voyager full of holidaymakers. Another excellent day on my favourite preserved line - but most importantly the staff were fantastic, interested and not at all snobbish about the diesel weekend displacing more family steam heritage traction. Add the decent weather for most of the day and the rather good food served on-board, and you have a recipe for the perfect gala. I'm much looking forward to the next diesel event, where they hope to feature some guest locos too.

Movebook Link

Lost::MikeGTN

I've had a home on the web for more years than I care to remember, and a few kind souls persuade me it's worth persisting with keeping it updated. This current incarnation of the site is centred around the blog posts which began back in 1999 as 'the daylog' and continued through my travels and tribulations during the following years.

I don't get out and about nearly as much these days, but I do try to record significant events and trips for posterity. You may also have arrived here by following the trail to my former music blog Songs Heard On Fast Trains. That content is preserved here too.

Navigate Lost::MikeGTN

Find articles by category
Find articles by date

Search Lost::MikeGTN